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James O. Goldsborough is an award-winning writer with a 40-year career in journalism, specializing in foreign affairs. His latest book, "The Paris Herald," a novel published in 2014 by Prospecta Press, tells the story of America's first and greatest newspaper published abroad, focusing on the 1960s when the Paris Edition of the New York Herald Tribune was transformed into the International Herald Tribune, owned the the Washington Post and New York Times. Prior to that, he wrote "Misfortunes of Wealth: A Family Memoir," published in 2008 and dealing with the disadvantages of inherited money. He is currently at work on two novels, one dealing with Los Angeles in the 20th Century and a second focused on the first American invasion of Cuba, the Lopez expedition of 1851.

James Goldsborough spent 15 years in Europe as a foreign correspondent for the International Herald Tribune, Toronto Star and Newsweek Magazine before returning to New York as a senior associate for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he wrote: "Rebel Europe: Living with a Changing Continent." (Macmillan 1982). The book was acclaimed by J.W. Fulbright, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee as: "the most perceptive and profound analysis of the reasons why the influence and prestige of the United States have suffered such a decline during the past 20 years."

Goldsborough has written on foreign affairs for many leading magazines (see links) including Foreign Affairs, the New York Times Magazine, Foreign Policy, Fortune and the Columbia Journalism Review. In addition, he has written monographs for the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations and the Henry L. Stimson Center. His monograph for the Stimson Center – “CNN Effect? The Media’s Role in Foreign Policy” – is a thorough examination of the interaction among media, public opinion and policy makers in the shaping of foreign policy.

Prior to working in Europe for the New York Herald Tribune, Goldsborough was a reporter at the San Francisco Examiner, Honolulu Advertiser and Arizona Republic. He is a 1958 graduate of UCLA with a bachelor’s degree in economics and attended law school at the University of California’s Boalt Hall. He has also attended Mexico City College and the Goethe Institut in Berlin. He is fluent in French, German and Spanish. In 1958-1960 he served in the U.S. Army, attached to Special Services.

Goldsborough was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, 1974-1991; officer of the San Diego World Affairs Council, 1995-2001; member of the World Affairs Council of San Francisco, 1984-1986; co-founder of the World Forum of Silicon Valley, 1986; member of the Edward R. Murrow Selection Committee at the Council on Foreign Relations, 1981-1984, and board member of the American School in Paris, 1976-1979. He resides in San Diego.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James O. Goldsborough is an award-winning writer with a 40-year career in journalism, specializing in foreign affairs. His latest book, "The Paris Herald," a novel published in 2014 by Prospecta Press, tells the story of America's first and greatest newspaper published abroad, focusing on the 1960s when the Paris Edition of the New York Herald Tribune was transformed into the International Herald Tribune, owned the the Washington Post and New York Times. Prior to that, he wrote "Misfortunes of Wealth: A Family Memoir," published in 2008 and dealing with the disadvantages of inherited money. He is currently at work on two novels, one dealing with Los Angeles in the 20th Century and a second focused on the first American invasion of Cuba, the Lopez expedition of 1851. James Goldsborough spend 15 years in Europe as a foreign correspondent for the International Herald Tribune, Toronto Star and Newsweek Magazine before returning to New York as a senior associate for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he wrote: "Rebel Europe: Living with a Changing Continent." (Macmillan 1982). The book was acclaimed by J.W. Fulbright, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee as: "the most perceptive and profound analysis of the reasons why the influence and prestige of the United States have suffered such a decline during the past 20 years."